Saturday, March 13, 2010

EAT SUSTAINABLE SEAFOOD

Global fisheries are on the verge of collapse. According to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), three quarters of the world’s fisheries are now overexploited, fully exploited, significantly depleted or recovering from overexploitation. What does that mean? It means soon most varieties of the fish we like to eat will become endangered or plain out extinct! Eating sustainable seafood means you are eating fish populations that can recover. Fish types that are overpopulated or spawn quickly. 
............Sustainable Seafood Guide............
Better Choices Alaska King Crab
Anchovies
Arctic Char
Bluefish
Catfish (farmed)
Clams
Crab: Blue, Dungeness, King
Crawfish
Dogfish

Hake
Halibut (Pacific)

Herring (Atlantic)
Mackerel: Atlantic, Spanish
Mussels (Black, Green-lipped)
Octopus (Pacific)
Oysters (farmed)
Pacific Black Cod (sablefish)
Pacific Cod (pot or jig caught)
Pollack (Alaska)
Prawns (trap-caught, Pacific)
Rock Lobster (Australian)
Salmon (Wild Alaskan)
Sardines (Pacific)
Scallops (Bay - farmed)
Shrimp (US farmed)
Squid (Pacific)
Striped Bass (hybrid)
Sturgeon (farmed)
Tilapia (farmed)
Tuna: Pacific Albacore
Uni (sea urchin)
Moderate Risk Flounder: "Summer Flounder" Fluke
Lingcod

Lobster (Atlantic)
Mahi Mahi or Dorado
Octopus (Atlantic)
Prawns (US farmed or wild)
Rainbow Trout (farmed)

Salmon (wild from WA, OR, BC Canada)
Scallops (Sea, Bay wild)
Shrimp (domestic, trawl-caught)
Snow Crab
Sole (Pacific)
Squid (Atlantic)
Swordfish (Pacific)
Tuna: Yellowfin or skipjack
Best to Avoid

Atlantic Cod
Caviar (wild sturgeon)
Grouper
Haddock (Atlantic)
Halibut (Atlantic)

Hoki (Atlantic, New Zealand)

King Crab (Russia)
Monkfish
Orange Roughy
Pacific Rockfish (Rock Cod)
Pollack (Atlantic)
Prawns (imported, tiger)

Red Snapper
Salmon (farmed worldwide)
Scrod
Seabass: Chilean
Shark: all species
Skate
Sturgeon (wild)
Swordfish (Atlantic)
Tuna: Bluefin
Turbot
Yellowtail Flounder




Go here to print you out some pocket guides in order to shop correctly!


Interesting fact:
900,000 - Metric tons of wasted fish - 28% of the annual catch - that gets tossed overboard because they are not the desired species.

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